Friday, February 27, 2009

Your Work Selected for new LogoLounge Master Library


Received an e-mail this afternoon informing me that one of the logos I'd submitted to the LogoLounge database has been selected for their first Master Library books. It is a distinct honor and great pleasure to have been selected.

The logo selected is one I did for Double R Manufacturing Inc. A powdercoating company in Roseburg, Oregon. The logo unfortunately was ultimately unused due to inhouse politics.


"Your work has been selected for a remarkable new LogoLounge project, the first book in the new Master Library series.

What is the Master Library series?

Like our existing (and continuing) LogoLounge book series, the new Master Library books will bring you plenty of exemplary logo design work from creatives around the world.

Unlike our original series, though, each book in the Master Library series will focus on a very specific logo design category, to wit:


• Initials & Crests
• Typography
• People
• Animals, Birds and Mythology
• Shapes and Symbols
• Nature and Food
• Arts and Culture (including transportation, sports and architecture)

We’d like to include your work in the inaugural book, Initials & Crests."



Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

The Bureau Loves You


My friend and fellow designer Keith Bowman, the principle over at The Design Bureau of Amerika has launched the official Design Bureau Blog.

Here you will find all the latest news regarding The Bureau’s projects. To show our gratitude for those who have supported us over the years, we are making available for download many of the assets that we use to create our work. There also will be content created exclusively for this site. All content will be FREE.


Keith is an enormously inspirational design talent and good friend. Yes, that is him in the painful photo above. Check out the print he did recently for local singer / songwriter, Joe D’Amico. For Joe’s CD, “Something in the Silence” as part of the Bureau's screen printing studio, Amerikan Made Prints™. And check back often to Keith's new blog. I know I will be.



something-in-the-silence_large




Bookmark and Share

Saturday, February 14, 2009

New Pepsi Logo Spouts Controversy



www.pepsi.com


Pepsi has recently modified their logo again to a barrage of criticism. The recognizable Pepsi wave, which has been a staple of the logo since the 60's has been turned on it's ear in this latest consideration. The logo retains the colors of it's predecessor but little else. Gone is the familiar symmetrical wave, it's been replaced with a skewed, barely recognizable version accompanied by a much lighter, airy typeface. The result is a distorted, watered down mutate of its former self, that in my opinion devalues years of brand equity.

Some excerpts and links from across the web exploring the reaction the logo has had upon it's debut.



NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- How long does it take to remake an icon? Try five months.

That's the amount of time Pepsi took to revamp its famous logo, after top executives Indra Nooyi and Massimo d'Amore called for a "quantum leap" forward in transforming the soft-drink category and defining Pepsi as a cultural leader, said Frank Cooper, Pepsi's VP-portfolio brands.

"We felt like, as we move out of this traditional mass marketing and mass distribution era into today's culture, there's an opportunity to bring humanity back, both in terms of the design but also in the way we engage consumers," he said. "By making the logo more dynamic and more alive ... [it is] absolutely a huge step in the right direction."

And a costly one. Pepsi would not discuss what it's paying for the revamp, but experts estimate the cost for a top firm to work five months at north of $1 million. But that's just the beginning. The real cost, said an expert, is in removing the old logo everywhere it appears and putting new material up. For Coke or Pepsi, when you add up all the trucks, vending machines, stadium signage, point-of-sale materials and more around the world, it could easily tally several hundred million dollars, the expert said.

The new logo is a white band in the middle of Pepsi's circle that loosely forms a series of smiles: A smile will characterize brand Pepsi, while a grin is used for Diet Pepsi and a laugh is used for Pepsi Max. The new logo is Pepsi's 11th in its 110-year history. Five logos have been introduced in the past 21 years, with the last update in 2002. http://adage.com


Before & After: Does Pepsi’s new logo work?

Before & After: Old Pepsi, New Pepsi
Pic: Evolution of the Pepsi Logo
Brand New: In Brief: Pepsi Gets Official
Brand New: In Brief: The Wrong Kind of Breathtaking
Brand New: Pepsi, New Bottles
AdRants: Pepsi Unveils Packaging to 'Digital and Social Media Influencers'
Typophile: New Pepsi Logo: What Grade Do You Give It?
Fast Company: Pepsi Logo Design Brief: Branding Lunacy to the Max

Personally, I'll stick with a Coke!





Bookmark and Share

Friday, February 13, 2009

Design Inspiration: Carlos Araujo


I've just posted a great new interview with Brazilian illustrator and long-time SFG member Carlos Araujo. Be sure to click on over and check it out, and leave Carlos some love!

http://diinterviews.com/




Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Obama Image: Copyright Infringement?



Apparently the now famous poster designed by artist Shepard Fairey is being alleged by the Associated Press to be copyright infringement based on the 2006 file photo of then-Sen. Barack Obama by Associated Press photographer Manny Garcia at the National Press Club in Washington. What are your thoughts on this issue?

The full story can be found here -AP alleges copyright infringement of Obama image.



Bookmark and Share

Monday, February 09, 2009

Jeff Andrews Design: Logo Design Roundup - Over 50 Ways Designers Promote & Brand Themselves

The latest installment of Logo Design Roundup - Over 50 Ways Designers Promote & Brand Themselves includes the logo for Jeff Andrews Design.





From the website: This is the fourth part in a series showcasing a collection of logos and brand marks, self submitted by a bunch of designers and creative folk in many creative areas. These designers use the logos to sell, promote, brand and market their various skills.


Logo Design Roundup Part 1

Logo Design Roundup Part 2
Logo Design Roundup Part 3

Special thanks to Graham Smith




Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, February 03, 2009

Forbes Magazine: Graphic Design is a Snooty Business

A disappointing turn of events today as a recent article published in Forbes Magazine comes to light. Dated February 16th, 2009, it's entitled The Creativity of Crowds, and states, "CrowdSpring aims to slash the cost of graphic design work--and democratize a snooty business."

The article proves to be poorly researched and irresponsible, and in my opinion serves as little more than an advertisement for Crowdspring. Crowdspring, in simplest terms, is a contest site. Would be designers can post an image (logo, stationery, website design) in the hopes of winning a prize. No guarantees however. Crowdspring's own user agreement clearly states:

We have no control over and do not guarantee the quality, safety or legality of Creative Services, the truth or accuracy of project listings or member information, the qualifications, background, or abilities of members, the ability of creatives to deliver Creative Services, or that members will complete a transaction.


This type of business plan, would be considered spec work. Spec work is clearly defined on the NO!SPEC website as "Any work done on a speculative basis. In other words, any requested work for which a fair and reasonable fee has not been agreed upon, preferably in writing. In a nutshell, spec requires the designer to invest time and resources with no guarantee of payment."

To say that this is dangerous business model would be an understatement. The most obvious reason is that, as a consumer looking to benefit from this model and get some design work on the cheap, you're most likely trusting your design work to someone with very little actual design experience, and no guarantee that the design you choose is original. In fact, the article even states:
"The beauty of our site is that it doesn't matter if you have a degree from the Rhode Island School of Design or if you're a grandma in Tennessee with a bunch of free time and Adobe Illustrator," says Samson. "If the client likes the grandma's work better, then she's going to get the job."
Keep your fingers crossed that Grandma hasn't swiped that design from the most recent Design Annual, or from Ladies Home Journal for that matter. Some would argue that you're not guaranteed originality even from the most seasoned veteran designer. My reply to that argument is that, "In that event you have a face to place to the blame." As clearly stated in the quote above, Crowdspring will take no blame if this were to occur. Scary.

My friends Cat Morley and Jeff Fisher and designer Debbie Millman have reported having been contacted to contribute to this article, but despite numerous attempts to connect with the author, nothing became of it. It would seem that an opposing point of view wasn't really necessary to post this advertisement.

Jeff Fisher said: "A couple weeks ago Cat Morley emailed me with a request from Forbes magazine for someone to discuss NO!SPEC and the crowdsourcing (spec work in disguise) of a certain company. I contacted the reporter and set up a phone interview time with him. I never heard from him at the appointed time. I emailed him the next morning. He said he'd been tied up at the appointment time and he'd call me immediately - and I never received a call. I also gave him the contact info for Sean Adams and Debbie Millman of AIGA as possible sources for the article. He said he appreciated the information as he had tried to call the AIGA office the day before. Debbie emailed the reporter to let him know she was available - and never heard from him."


Additional insight can be found at the following links:

Brian Yerkes - Why CrowdSpring Owners Should Be Ashamed of Their Business
David Airey - Forbes calls designers snooty
Steve Douglas - Design is a 'snooty' business: Forbes
Steph Doyle's - Forbes Promotes Graphic Design Kitsch
NO!SPEC - Forbes Says Designers are Snooty
AIGA - Position on Spec Work



Bookmark and Share

Sunday, February 01, 2009

Watch the '09 Super Bowl Ads Right Here

I found a great widget on Hulu.com where you can add the Super Bowl Commercials right to your blog or website. They'll be updating and adding commercials continuously throughout the game. Pretty sweet!





Bookmark and Share